Nature in Canada: Forest Tent Caterpillars

The Canadian provinces of Quebec and Ontario have witnessed an explosion of forest tent caterpillars this summer. This type of caterpillar can be found throughout North America, but especially within the eastern region of the continent. These gray, dark brown, or black caterpillars have distinctive white spots down the middle of their bodies that are … Continue reading Nature in Canada: Forest Tent Caterpillars

American Toads: How Sustainable Are Amphibian Populations?

This Fall, I took a course in Conservation Biology, which provided me with the opportunity to ask my professor, David Green, what species of toad I happened to stumble upon in my yard last summer. According to him, an expert in the field of amphibian research, this is a female American Toad, scientifically known as … Continue reading American Toads: How Sustainable Are Amphibian Populations?

Nature in Canada: Painted Lady Butterflies

Throughout the late summer and early fall, Montréal was greeted with a gorgeous influx of painted-lady butterflies, also scientifically known as Vanessa cardui of the Nymphalidae family. They were visible fluttering about over nearly every floral surface, with their distinctive brown upper-hind white-spotted wings and beautiful 42 to 66-millimetre yellow and salmon coloured wingspan. These … Continue reading Nature in Canada: Painted Lady Butterflies

How Sustainable Are Our Patterns of Consumption?

It is public knowledge that a capitalistic system heavily governs North America, prioritizing the needs of a select minority: privatized corporations. This elite class determines the extraction, production, distribution, consumption, and disposal of public goods, creating an unjust distribution of power reasoned by the World Systems Theory. First world (developed) countries benefit by exploiting and … Continue reading How Sustainable Are Our Patterns of Consumption?